Photo 24 Jul its my feast day. please find yourself a sweet treat to eat in honor of my 25th year of being a gilded demon god.

its my feast day. please find yourself a sweet treat to eat in honor of my 25th year of being a gilded demon god.

Photo 13 Jul 1 note "You know I’m not a Saint"
shitty preview picture. i have to either take a better picture or clean off my desk and set up my scanner.
its not my best piece but its the first thing I’ve done in a while. I’m getting back to my work now that i have more time. (read: no longer taking crazy hour shifts at my day job) 
this is the first in a series of collaborative works between myself and iregretthisnow.

"You know I’m not a Saint"

shitty preview picture. i have to either take a better picture or clean off my desk and set up my scanner.

its not my best piece but its the first thing I’ve done in a while. I’m getting back to my work now that i have more time. (read: no longer taking crazy hour shifts at my day job) 

this is the first in a series of collaborative works between myself and iregretthisnow.

Photo 9 Jun 2 notes look i drew a thing. a real live thing that i drew cause i had an actual weekend. inked by weirdcomicbookkid

look i drew a thing. a real live thing that i drew cause i had an actual weekend. inked by weirdcomicbookkid

Text 24 May im so sorry.

i’ve been working literally non-stop for a month and some change. i work at a barn caring for horses. we suddenly became short on staff so I’ve picked up the slack, plus my boss is pregnant so I’m also doing a lot for her. i work 10 hours a day spend an hour and a half each day getting to and from work and then i need my 8 hours so this only leaves me an hour and a half in the morning and at night to be home and not working. this is the first weekend I’ve had off in weeks.

Photo 31 Mar 3 notes oops my pencil slipped. also i though “phwoar” was a sound effect like a cross between a “roar” and “whoa” that lucian made when seeing something attractive because I’m uncool and not up with internet slang. 
hope you like it! stammsternenstaub

oops my pencil slipped. also i though “phwoar” was a sound effect like a cross between a “roar” and “whoa” that lucian made when seeing something attractive because I’m uncool and not up with internet slang. 

hope you like it! stammsternenstaub

Video 29 Mar 5 notes

shoe revamp

its not art but I’m still proud of the job i did. the original boots were a super cold but bright pale grey. with dark pants they looked white. i grabbed a bottle of dye and watered it down so i had a dark grey and a lighter grey and started layering, spattering, dripping, and generally making a mess. i wanted them to look like they’d been around for a while and maybe a black blooded monster had been slain while wearing them. I’m super happy. i also just remembered i did something similar with a dress and now i have to wear them together.

Photo 5 Mar 1 note progress/ i dont know how to treat the rest of it

progress/ i dont know how to treat the rest of it

Photo 5 Mar 1 note wip medusa which may turn into a garter like tattoo on my thigh. i like her face but its hard to keep the snakes from getting cartoony.

wip medusa which may turn into a garter like tattoo on my thigh. i like her face but its hard to keep the snakes from getting cartoony.

Video 26 Jan 30,687 notes

paintaloosa:

All right, here’s my contribution to the art tutorial infographic world, part 1 of 2.  I’ve noticed that even in professional illustration, so often the humans and environments and armor and whatnot is really, really great— correct anatomy, lighting, proportions, like ‘wow this is fantastic WAIT what is up with that HORSE?’

I suspect two things;

First is that I spend 15 hours a day, 365 days a year looking, touching, handling, and just generally being around horses.  

Second is that most people do not.  

Artists have lost touch with their connection to horses as contemporary society has lost touch with them.  Generally, we don’t have that constant presence of horses in our lives that previous generations did, as horses aren’t part of the everyday landscape any more.  They don’t work the fields, they don’t cart the goods, they don’t deliver the mail or transport you to the next town down the road.

However, we still see horses all the time— in movies, books, illustration, ads and logos, we are presented with the image of horses all the time.  So we assume ‘yes, I have seen horses often and I know what they look like.’  Because of our exposure, we as artists don’t always feel like we need to heavily reference the animals as if we were drawing something we don’t see everyday (say, like elephants or giraffes or sea cucumbers).  Our brain just kind of plugs in ‘horse shaped’ and we go with that.

And I suspect that ends up being where a lot of these common mistakes occur.  Dogs are familiar, but we can easily find a dog to draw from live, to see the way the shapes of its face are put together in 3-dimensions.  Cats, humans, birds… if we venture just a little ways outside our studios (or in some cases, inside), we can find live models to study easily.  

You can’t really do that with horses.  They’re a commodity, sequestered away behind fences on private farms and shuttered away in barns.   So few people really get the chance to be up close and have that hands-on experience to really learn how a horse is put together.

So here’s some things, based on my own experience both drawing and working with horses, that might help you if you find yourself needing to draw one for yourself.

The approach I took might be more complicated than absolutely necessary, but I tried to present the subject of ‘how to draw horses’ a little differently than I’ve seen it done before.  I hope someone finds it understandable, and more importantly, helpful!

If you share this, please don’t delete my commentary about it above. Thanks :3

very needed right now. i work at a stable and im just having trouble drawing my babies. so expect a few horse paintings to come.

Video 21 Jan 42,613 notes

saucymerbabe:

briannacherrygarcia:

itscourtoon:

bathsabbath:

thorhugs:

compactcarl:

egriz:

im not even an artist and these prices are hurting my feelings 

This is what I have to dig through every time I look for new jobs to apply for.

For non-artists, let’s give you a little perspective.

For me, an illustration takes a bare minimum of 6 hours. Mind you, that’s JUST the drawing part. Not the research, or the communications, or gathering information. Just drawing.

That’s if it’s a simple illustration.

My art deco or more detailed stuff can take 20+ hours each.

Even simple, cartoony things still take at least 3 hours.

Let’s go with the second one. 2 illustrations for $25. Figuring 6 hours each. 12 hours total, for JUST the drawings. That’s approximately $2.08/hour. 

Asking these prices is an insult. But what’s even more hurtful is there are people out there that will take these jobs. Which only encourages rates like this to be acceptable. And there are people who will try to say these are just what you have to do to get started.

I believed that. So my first coloring gigs were just $10/page. The day someone offered me $25/page for just flatting work, I realized just how wrong I’d been. I’m still not making the rates I’d like, but now I refuse anything below $25/page. Because there is value in my time.

In any standardized industry, even ones that pay piece rate over hourly, these numbers are criminal.

Do your fellow artists a favor. Never accept jobs like these. There are others that pay legitimate rates. Or at least closer to legitimate.

Such baby bullshit. Don’t even get out of bed for these rates.

    If you are an artist who wants to make money off their art, I highly suggest you buy The Graphic Artist’s Guild Handbook. It goes in depth about copyright issues and even contains contract and model release templates. The 2013 book *I believe* states the average professional charges $72 an hour. This article calculated that to make a 40k annual salary you would need to charge about $60 per hour.

  After graduating from Art Center in 2012, I think I asked for somewhere between $35-45 an hour and got laughed at by multiple big name clients, which was infuriating, sadly expected, and terrifying with over $100K worth of student loans staring me in the face. If they tell you it will be “great exposure” that’s a red flag. Ask yourself how their exposure can compare to your Tumblr, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Flickr and Facebook pages combined? 

And when you do get a decent paying gig, PROTECT YOURSELF. You have the right to negotiate and revise a contract. Do not start a job until you have a contract signed. If they don’t provide you with one, MAKE ONE. And make sure you have your bases covered. You can specify in a contract that maybe two revisions are included in your cost, and if they ask you to revise the piece more than twice, they will have to pay extra. In terms of payment schedule, I usually do the 50/50 Method (50% before, 50% after) or the 3/3/3 Method (1/3 before, 1/3 in the middle, 1/3 after all work has been received). Both of those are pretty standard in the industry, as they guarantee you will get compensated for your time, even if the job goes bad.

Remember you have a skill, and you have spent time honing that skill and you deserve to be adequately paid for that time and effort. You will have clients dismiss you because, honest to God they think, “Well, I could do that if I wanted. Hell, my five year old does it now.” No they can’t, because they didn’t, they don’t, they won’t and they probably never will. And good luck hiring a five year old. They can’t keep a fucking deadline.

And in a last ditch effort they’ll say, “But that drawing only took you an hour!” Son, that drawing took me 20. fucking. years.

10 Dollars for 1 minute of animation.  Oh my god my heart.  It took my team 6 months and a team of 12 to make a 4 minute short. 

The Graphic Artist’s Guild Handbook

I second this book! I’ve had it for several years now, and it’s been a HUGE help in my work as a freelance artist. It gives great advice on what to charge for different areas of art!

Even in my little corner of freelance caricatures I refuse to work for minimum wage rates. Nope. I will time how long it takes to do a certain style and price accordingly to time and quality. If someone asks for extra, I politely require extra compensation.

I don’t charge a whole lot for what I do. Sometimes I’ll offer cheap little promotions. I used to charge super cheap for my art. I used to do $10-$15 commissions. Sometimes $5. I’m finding out with my skill and realizing just what I need to have a fair pay I’ve gradually raised my prices within the $25-$35 range.

Mind you I only do caricatures with a single backdrop. And I’m still finding out I have people commissioning me willing to pay me a lot more.

So please, don’t underestimate your work. Your time. Your talent. Even if you don’t have much freelance work under your belt, your time and work is still valuable.

I used to do photography for an old friend. She’s a musician and she now runs a small business where she would hire me to travel all the way out to Atlanta for a weekend.

And she wouldn’t pay me jack shit. I paid the bus fare. I worked two sessions, went to three different locations to photograph one of her clients. I sat down and did post processing work upwards to a week or two.

And was told ‘experience’ and ‘exposure’ because it was my first time. Then the following times she tried to do that again. And again. And again. Ripping me off. Digging into my pockets. Taking advantage of me.

Nope. NOPE. Don’t let that shit happen either with friends. I’m not saying you can’t be generous and do things for your friends here and there. But don’t sell yourself short.

Because again, your time and work is valuable. And just like anyone else in this world you are doing a service for someone else and that service is not free.


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